The Forgotten Story of NYC's First Power Grid

Lower Manhattan of the 1880s was a wonderland of futuristic technology and engineering: The city's first cable car arced over the harbor. A spindly new steel bridge was forming to connect Williamsburg to the city. And on the Lower East Side, Edison was tearing up the streets to build the first permanent power station… » 1/26/15 4:13pm Today 4:13pm

CERN Wants Artists and Architects Working Alongside Its Physicists

What do art and high-energy physics have in common? Quite a bit, if you think about it: Space, time, and the structure of the visible and invisible world, for starters. That's why CERN has spent the past four years inviting artists into its headquarters, and why, for the first time, it's now inviting an architect to… » 1/26/15 11:50am Today 11:50am

What You Can See From the Tallest Observation Decks On Earth

It's only been a few years since humans could climb more than half a mile above the surface of the Earth without the help of jet fuel. It's easy to forget that buildings that reach this high into the atmosphere are a new phenomenon in our world—at these heights, it's more like aerospace engineering than architecture.
» 1/23/15 9:01am Friday 9:01am

How NASA Plans to Explore Mars With Microsoft's Holographic Goggles

During Microsoft's demo of its fascinating holographic headset HoloLens today, the company barely mentioned the coolest way it's already using it: to develop software with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that will let scientists explore and work on the Red Planet remotely. » 1/21/15 5:35pm Wednesday 5:35pm

A Closer Look at the Retractable Roof of Atlanta's Bonkers New Stadium

Remember when the Atlanta Falcons announced they'd be building a new stadium—using a boatload of public money—that would be crowned with a retractable roof? The architects of the $1.2 billion project recently passed along a new fly-through of the design. And while it's our best look yet at the structure, it also… » 1/20/15 7:04pm Tuesday 7:04pm

Astrophysicists Find That Cities Grow Just Like Galaxies 

We've all looked out at the night sky and wondered at how much the stars look like strings of cities. But there's more than a passing resemblance—according to a team of astrophysicists who compared the two, there's a much deeper connection at work. We aren't just made of stars, we act like them too. » 1/20/15 9:42am 1/20/15 9:42am

These Drawings Were Made By the Bad Guys In Legend of Zelda

The other day I was playing SNES on an emulator and it suddenly struck me: The incredible amount of work that went into creating every single tiny box of light on that screen. It sounds like a simple point, but less so when you glimpse the math and complexity behind video games in action. » 1/16/15 10:55am 1/16/15 10:55am

Four Ideas to Fix Beijing's Smog Airpocalypse, And One That Will Work 

The worst smog of the year so far swept into Beijing this week, coating the city in a grainy, deep grey murk on par with what the city endured in 2013, pictured above (though you'll see it's popping up again today). China is trying, hard, to get its air quality problem under control, and is considering some seriously… » 1/15/15 1:35pm 1/15/15 1:35pm

The Truly Brilliant Design History of the Selfie Stick

I was at the beach a few weeks ago when I witnessed a three-generation family taking a group selfie (just try to make me call it an usie) in the surf using a selfie stick. A few minutes later, an adult couple repeated the scene. And so on. When, I wondered, did this weird little gimmick become a ubiquitous gadget? » 1/15/15 12:00pm 1/15/15 12:00pm

That Time Frank Lloyd Wright Went On What's My Line 

A lighthearted 1950s gameshow is the last place most of us would look for Frank Lloyd Wright, America's most well-known—only known?—architect. But in 1956, Wright appeared on the game show What's My Line?, where he endured the indignity of being questioned by a bunch of randos with aplomb. » 1/14/15 5:20pm 1/14/15 5:20pm

A Recipe Book For the Coolest DIY Projects You Never Knew How To Do 

Building an anechoic chamber. Mapping the Wi-Fi in your building. Listening to the Earth with piezo microphones. These are all fascinating projects, and we've featured artists and engineers who have done them here on Giz before. But now, there's a book in which they explain how. » 1/14/15 5:00pm 1/14/15 5:00pm